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10/1 Adjustable Rate Mortgage

The 10/1 adjustable rate mortgage evolves with you as you build your foundation.

OUR GREAT RATES

Month Rate APR Payment*
First 120 $
Next 240 $

*Payments shown do not include taxes or insurance, actual payments may be greater. Rates and offers are in effect as of  for new applications only, for a limited time, and subject to change without notice. Example based on $ loan. Other restrictions apply. Rate is variable and can increase by no more than percentage points after the initial ten year period and percentage points at each subsequent annual rate adjustment, with a lifetime maximum adjustment of % (% for this example). Since the value of the index in the future is unknown, the First Adjustment Payments displayed are based on the current index plus margin (fully indexed rate) as of the date above.

Features & Benefits

  • Lower initial monthly payment
  • Low down payment
  • Free 60 day rate lock
  • For home purchases or refinancing
  • Loan amounts up to $453,100
  • Offers available on primary and secondary homes
DISCLOSURES: Print IconPrint

Investment properties not eligible for offers.

All Adjustable Rate Mortgage Programs: The application of additional loan level pricing adjustments will be determined by various loan attributes to include but not limited to the loan-to-value (LTV) ratio, credit score, transaction type, property type, product type, occupancy, and subordinate financing.

10/1 ARMs - Offer available for purchases and refinances. The initial rate can change after 10 years by no more than 5 percentage points up or down. After the initial rate change, the rate will adjust annually by no more than 2 percentage points up or down, never to exceed 5 percentage points above the initial rate. When the rate adjusts at the initial rate change, your new rate will be the then current index plus margin, which is currently set at 2.750% for the new products as long as it does not exceed the 5% adjustment cap.

Conforming Mortgages: For loan amounts from $25,000 to $424,100 (Loan amounts up to $ are available in Guam, Alaska and Hawaii). The maximum combined loan- to-value (CLTV) is 95%; 80% LTV and above are subject to private mortgage insurance (PMI). The maximum LTV and CLTV for condominiums is 80%.

For purchase applications, please submit a copy of your fully signed ratified purchase agreement to lockrate@penfed.org in a timely manner to ensure PenFed can meet your closing date.

The applicant is responsible for the following fees and costs at the time of closing: Origination fee, appraisal fee, tax service fee, CLO access fee, title fees, transfer tax fees, credit report fee, flood cert fee, recording fee, survey if required and work verification fee, escrow reserves and interest due until first payment. Other costs may be included due to program specific circumstances. This is not intended to be an all-inclusive list.

Escrows may be waived if LTV is 80% or less in all states.

Additional reserve requirements may apply.

If you withdraw an application that was locked and reapply within 30 days, the new application is subject to worst case pricing.

All rates and offers are in effect as of , offered for a limited time and subject to change without notice. Restrictions apply to existing PenFed mortgage borrowers. Other restrictions may apply. Contact your PenFed mortgage consultant for any applicable additional restrictions and details about your loan. To receive any advertised product you must become a member of PenFed by opening a share (savings) account. Federally insured by the NCUA.

We do business in accordance with the Federal Fair Housing Law and the Equal Credit Opportunity Act.

ARM vs Fixed Rate Mortgages: Which One Should You Choose?

Posted October 2016
by PenFed Team

For purchase applications, please submit a copy of your fully signed ratified purchase agreement to  lockrate@penfed.org  in a timely manner to ensure PenFed can meet your closing date.

With mortgage interest rates at an all-time low you’re probably thinking about finally taking the big leap and becoming a homeowner or refinancing your existing home to a lower interest rate. However, the age-old question looms in front of you…which mortgage should I choose, an ARM or a fixed-rate mortgage?

The answer: it depends on your needs. While there are pros and cons to both mortgages, the real question is not which mortgage is better, but which mortgage will suit my needs.

Let’s take a look at both an ARM and fixed-rate mortgage and then you can decide which option is going to afford you your dream home or that tantalizing interest rate that will have you running to refinance your home.

Adjustable-Rate Mortgages

Adjustable-rate mortgages or ARMs have interest rates that adjust over a period of time. ARMs have had a notoriously bad reputation because of the mortgage meltdown and subsequent recession.

While this reputation was justified in the past, most of those exotic ARMs no longer exist. Today, financial institutions offer hybrid ARMs—like PenFed’s 5/5 ARM, which has a fixed-rate for five years and then the rate adjusts once every five years. This is a unique mortgage product as most ARMs adjust annually after the initial fixed terms.

The thought of an adjustable interest rate probably has you fearing skyrocketing monthly mortgage payments. Fear not, all ARMs have caps—a limit on the amount the interest rate can adjust—and ceilings—the highest the interest rate is allowed to become during the life of the loan. Using PenFed’s 5/5 ARM as an example, the initial interest rate will change every five years by no more than two percentage points up or down (the cap). This rate will never exceed five percentage points above the initial rate (the ceiling).

Fixed-Rate Mortgages

A fixed-rate mortgage provides a reliable and fixed monthly payment for the life of the loan. Because your total mortgage payment remains stable from month to month, homeowners can easily budget their monthly expenses.

Financial institutions offer various fixed-rate mortgages including the more common fixed-rate mortgages: 15, 20, and 30-year.  Out of the three the 30-year fixed is the most popular mortgage because it usually offers the lowest monthly payment. However, the lower monthly payment comes at a cost of paying more in interest over the life of the loan.

Some Considerations

So, now that you know a little more about ARMs and fixed-rate mortgages here are a few things you should consider when making a decision about which mortgage will best suit your needs:

  • How long do you plan to stay in your home? If you don’t plan to stay in your home for the long haul, you may want to consider an ARM, which has a lower interest rate than the 30-year fixed and you save big money in interest charges. If you move or refinance within five years before the interest rate adjusts you can avoid a payment hike. Conversely, if you’ve found or are already in the home of your dreams, a fixed-rate mortgage makes more sense and will provide you stable payments for years to come.
  • What can you afford? Knowing how much you can afford to pay month to month in mortgage payments will also help you decide between an ARM or fixed-rate mortgage. If you’re working within a tight budget, the ARM may be a more attractive option since the payments will be lower than a 30-year fixed. But, unless you anticipate a raise or another source of added income, ask yourself if you’ll be able to afford your mortgage payment when the ARM’s interest rate increases. If not, don’t take the risk. Go with the fixed-rate mortgage and get stable monthly payments.

The Takeaway: When it’s all said and done, the goal is to get you into the home of your dreams or refinance your existing home without breaking your pockets. Both the ARM and fixed-rate mortgage are products that will help you reach your goal. However, the path you take to get to your goal depends on which mortgage will suit your needs.

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